Just because I’m a student doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t respect my time: Study guides

OK, I was going to write this blog post after I was done studying for the midterm, but I’m just too steamed right now so I’m going to vent and then get back to it. My plan right now is to spend this entire weekend re-reading all the chapters of the book and making notes on everything. (I keep these notes on my GitHub.)

I’m salty because I emailed the instructor a month ago and asked for the best way to study for the midterm. The response I got was:

Hi Rachel

Lecture notes and the book are probably the best way to prepare for the exam. 

So I guess that I’m just supposed to memorize every fucking thing out of the textbook, because there is no clear way to tell what this teacher things is important and what we will be assessed over.


A textbook I teach out of with only a few sentences highlighted

I clearly have not highlighted every paragraph of the Data Structures textbook that I teach from.

“Oh well you should be learning everything anyway.”

Sure, read all the content, absorb it all, but what we need to know of and what we need to have burned into our brains are very different. I sift through the textbooks that I teach out of and I sure as hell don’t highlight every damn line with what I think is important.

And it depends between teachers!

What I highlight and think is important is based on my own experience in the professional world with things that have come in handy, what I’ve needed to know, and so on. What somebody in academia thinks is important, someone whose research focus is operating systems, might be completely different than what someone thinks from a practical standpoint.

Textbooks are full of words. These words might be good in creating a flow for the textbook, but they are not reference material, and they do not only contain the important bits – they contain information on context, examples, and explanations. At some level, when studying, I’d prefer a reference book than a textbook, because there’s so much to sift through and pull out.

Something I probably don’t need to memorize, but is still mentioned in the textbook, taking up valuable space: “Two common techniques for loading executable files are double-clicking an icon representing the executable file and entering the name of the executable file on the command line (as in prog.exe or a.out).” – Operating Systems Concepts, 9th Edition, Silberschatz


It's part of a study guide that I've prepared.

It’s part of a study guide that I’ve prepared.

The study guides I prepare contain all of the information that I expect my students to know, and that they may potentially be tested over during an exam. It may still be a lot to read and learn, but it doesn’t compare to the amount of time they would have to spend in their textbook, guesstimating what may be important and what may not be.

Because how is a student supposed to properly figure what is and is not important? They’re students. They haven’t had the same background as the instructor, and cannot properly judge what the instructor is going to deem worthy to know.

Functions? Yes, you better damn well know the vocabulary relating to functions so that you can know what I’m talking about when I tell you specifically, “you’re not passing in enough arguments into your function call.”, because if you don’t know the definitions you’re lost.

You need to know how to use pointers, and the operator names and in what contexts what * does. But do you need to know how many bytes an integer, float, and double need? I don’t have that information memorized, and it has never affected me. So I don’t tell them to memorize that. That information is good for some background knowledge and context, but they don’t need to know how many bytes they’re allocating, at least in C++, to write a basic program.


So, in summary, it pisses me off when teachers don’t provide study guides. It already seems like a lot of teachers (especially at university level) have disdain for undergrad students, thinking that they’re so frivolous and immature. What could those kids possibly be doing with their time? Obviously all they should be doing is studying! It comes off as disrespectful. Many of us work, many have families – even at the community college level! – We have shit to do, we’re here to learn, but we’re not here to memorize textbooks. Exams really aren’t the best way to assess students, but when we have so many students there’s not really a chance to do things more personally.

I teach full time, and when you teach full time, that’s way more than a full time job. I’m working on visa paperwork and travel plans. I’m studying for classes. I’m trying to get an advisor and learn about gradschool. And I’m the only one at home to take care of things. And, sometimes, I want to play video games.


Next rant: “Why my powerpoints > your powerpoints”? the next chapter on “Why I’m a better teacher than you are”, the ego-driven blog series on why school sucks and why I make it sssooooo much better. ;P

See also: “Why I make my study notes public – so that other students don’t have to suffer as I have. My teaching philosophy in a nutshell.”

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