How I prepare for weekly lessons

Lecture prep with textbook open and video editor open.

Here’s a preview into how I create the content for my courses. I always hated slides straight from the textbook publishers, so I always make my own. I also frequently have to re-teach or re-view content that I’ve learned previously, so the best way to learn is to consume all the information and then be able to regurgitate it in my own words.

For discrete math, I first go through the book and highlight the important bits – definitions, laws, notes about how things work. So much content in textbooks is just fluff… while it can help you gain context for what you’re learning, I wish it were separated a little more… give me the pure information in one section, and the pure exposition in another. Examples after that. Make it easy to parse.

So I come up with what I want to cover – then I usually look line for additional resources. I frequently quote Wikipedia pages on math because it’s easier to cite; I don’t want to get in trouble for quoting the textbook (because proprietary, ugh.) There are also Wikibooks (a, b) on Discrete Math, and other class resources from other universities.

Next, I build my lectures. Yep, it’s a slideshow (built with the open source LibreOffice Impress), however:

  • I try to write out all the information that I want to cover for the chapter in these slides. I hate when class slides are useless on their own.
  • I use the slides to give information, show examples, and give practice problems.
  • I turn it into a video, for students to watch on their own time.

As I turn it into a video, I alleviate some of the shitty parts of slideshows further:

  • I don’t just record myself talking as I run through the slideshow “live”. Nope. I throw the slides in my video editor (kdenlive, also open source), then record my talk for each slide separately (with Audacity, also open source). I put them all together in the video editor. This means I cut out all the “ums”, pauses, and stumbles.
  • I insert in working math by-hand by recording myself working problems in a paint program (GIMP, open source) with my drawing tablet (a cheapo Wacom), recording the screen with OBS (also open source).

 

I’m currently writing the lesson plan for a chapter on logic circuits, which means I pull out another handy open source tool: dia.

Using dia to diagram circuits

It’s dia!!

I’ve found that I’m too busy this semester to actually grade paper homework. With my own homework and studying to do as a grad student, it just isn’t practical. Therefore, I’m also leveraging our LMS (learning management software) to build custom homework questions that are self-grading, and give students immediate feedback.

Creating a quiz in D2L

 

Millennials rock

“demographers and researchers typically use the early 1980s as starting birth years and the mid-1990s to early 2000s as ending birth years.”

I think that teachers of the my generation and future generations will end up being more effective because of our experience with various types of technology. Many of us have grown up editing videos, using YouTube, or even making animations (*cough*Newgrounds*cough*…) and when we leverage our experience into our professional lives, we become that much better at creating tools and content. As kids and teens, we learn to be content creators, whether we’re making videos about video games, or programming tutorials, or drawing, or whatever our interests are.

We aren’t afraid of technology, and we pick up the tools we need and teach ourselves. I have a toolbelt full of software for video editing, audio editing, music writing and sheet music creation, diagramming, art, animating, software development, and more. I taught myself to animate as a tween, which is a skill that has served me throughout the years. I began making YouTube programming tutorials when I was about 18, which is another skill that I still build and use today.

We don’t rely on expensive proprietary software to come along and let us teachers achieve what we need – there are tons of tools for all sorts of things, and many are free and open source. And if those tools don’t exist, there are more and more tools popping up for building your own.

We are the generation that creates!

(And is also sleep deprived from too much work. Looks like I’ll get less than 5 hours of sleep tonight…)

Happy things

IMG_-tozjax

Layer paint HD is cool!

Just drawing on my tablet 🙂

Is broke

The WordPress tags have gone haywire and I don’t feel like looking into why, and how to fix.

I could, and that’s the beauty of Open Source, but… it’s like 11 pm on a Saturday night, maaaaan.

Self control

IMG_lifxue

20170225_173903

Gotta resist…

nostalgia

When nothing sounds good.

I have a little bit of free time. I'm just going to stare off into space.

The Fall 2016 – Spring 2017 semester break was not a relaxing one…

Beginning of the semester

Haven't even made it to midterms yet

Lecture sucks

Scribbles on a slide that is incomprehensible if you're viewing independent of the class.

Scribbles on a slide that is incomprehensible if you’re viewing independent of the class.

One of my classes (that I’m a student in) is split into a lecture and a lab. The lecture is three days a week for one hour, and it is only lecture – slides without a theme (black text, white background), instructor talking, stuff from the textbook, occasional review questions.

They’re so boring. They suck. I can’t focus on them.

As a teacher, a lot of my teaching philosophy has been shaped by the frustrations I had as an undergrad — quizzes worded specifically to trick you, tests where the teacher doesn’t give you any clue as to what they think is important and what they will cover on the exam, boring-ass lectures…

Admittedly, since I teach at a community college, all of my classes are held in computer labs. It is wonderful. I have the ability to flip my classroom, record video lectures to watch as homework, and do programming during class. At university, there are too many students to have all computer science courses in labs – this is true at KU and at UMKC. Still, even though we are constrained to classrooms with desks instead of school computers, it would be nice to try to shake up the class in other ways.

My math classes aren’t just me lecturing the entire session. I give a short lecture, the video lectures that I recorded last semester are available online, and each week I write up an “in-class exercise“, which contains introduction text and examples, and then a series of questions. The students work in groups, and submit only one copy per team. They’re free to ask me questions as well. We spend time learning and practicing in the classroom, instead of putting all the onus on them figuring it out totally alone from the homework questions.

I resent pure lectures. They feel like a waste of my time. If the lectures are just going to reiterate content from the book, why not just let me read the textbook instead? Another big issue I have with lectures are that (1) I never go back and reference my notes. I just don’t. Over my 7 – 8 years as a college student, I just never go back, and (2) When I have taken notes in the past, any time I’m trying to recall something really specific, I can never find it. Probably because I cannot write as fast as teachers can talk.

This is why I record video lectures.

Students can watch again, pause, and watch when it is best for them.

Some teachers in previous classes would just record their in-class lecture – all 1+ hours of it – and post it as-is. You can’t find shit by sifting through such a long video, and it’s still boring as hell. It isn’t concise at all.

This is why I edit my video lectures.

I pre-script them. Usually, this means my slides are pretty detailed and it’s my main script. I export my slides to image files, put them in the video editor, then record my audio in Audacity. That way, I cut out all that is extra. Those go in the video lecture, too.

Then, if it’s a programming class, I use OBS to screen capture while I do some example coding – this is less scripted, but gives the same kind of example coding you’d get from a lecture. If it’s math, I open up GIMP and plug in my Wacom tablet and work some example problems. I further edit these down to get rid of long pauses and excess “ums” and speed up sections where I’m only writing stuff out or coding stuff after I have explained what I am doing.

I comb several books to figure out what points I need to make on the topic, and I put my slides together. Everything I would test over, I mention. I want my students to get everything they need, and be able to access that information at any time.

But it sucks for me.

I’m already the type of person who likes to control things, and gets annoyed when Redbox’s user interface isn’t as streamlined as I would like. (Brightspace has inconsistencies in user interface that drive me up a freaking wall!!!)

This means that when I’m a student rather than a teacher, I get really frustrated by the classes I take. I’m frustrated by the boredom, the inefficiency, the unknown, the schedule.

Best I can do? Basically go through the course content the way I would as a teacher – and write my own notes. Basically come up with the same sort of resources that I would as a teacher (because sometimes we have to teach ourselves the content while teaching, too – do you think I really remembered discrete math from when I took it 10+ years ago??)

So, just like I make repositories for my courses and throw all the content I make, available for anyone at any time (https://github.com/Rachels-Courses), I do the same with my classes. My notes, the code I write to try to learn the content, and so on. (https://github.com/Rachels-studies).

Preparing for class

  • Class prep