Inspiro

Only available in Esperanto

Languages, Text Parsers, and Video Games

I can speak English and Esperanto. I’ve started learning a handful of other languages, though I tend to have a hard time sticking with one. Oddly, sticking with Esperanto is easy, perhaps because I already have communities I’m part of, and uses for it, while with other languages – say, Korean – I really only get to use it at the nearby Korean grocery store.

But, I’ve decided to start learning Chinese. I decided that a couple of weeks ago, but so far I haven’t done much studying yet, just skimming pieces here and there. Do I start with reading on grammar? Do I start by studying Pinyin? Do I start by learning the building blocks of the writing system? Hm.

I’m a bit restless when it comes to sticking with a single textbook, and I want to start using the language as soon as I can, so then – do I memorize phrases and investigate how words are put together?

I began compiling a list of the verbs, nouns, and adjectives I find myself using the most in Esperanto. It’s hard to really quantify what English I use in my day-to-day life because it’s so engrained, but that’s one of the good things about being familiar with Esperanto – I have more of an explicit idea of what I’ve learned over the past three years, so it could perhaps be a blueprint of what I would need to learn for another language.

Building this list of words and common ways I end up combining them actually reminds me of writing a text parser for a text adventure (or something like the old King’s Quest games).  Actually – wouldn’t it be kind of fun to learn some basics of language through mixing and matching verbs and nouns together to interact with a virtual environment? (OK, maybe it appeals to me because I grew up with Sierra adventures…)

Though a problem with this method of “learning the patterns and extrapolating from there” would be more difficult for an irregular language, when you can’t always be sure that it will be something like “Verb-command-form [the] noun”

On a similar note – games can be a great way to give a controlled, somewhat immersive experience. If designed properly, a whole game could be in the target language, while not overwhelming the player with more nuanced parts of grammar.

If I pick up a new multiplayer game, for example, I pretty much always want to play Single Player first to get a feel for the maps, weapons, gameplay, etc. Similarly, I am going to be pretty shy when it comes to actually practicing a new language, I want a “safe sandbox” to practice in first.

And, with respect to old Sierra and LucasArts games, I know that I, personally, have heard a number of non-native-English speakers say that those games were a big part of how they learned English.

So, what might be a good way to apply language learning in a game medium? What games have done this, and done a decent job? Hmmm…

Donated Books, Magazines, and Newsletters in and about Esperanto

Just this past December, I had decided to make a group on Facebook for Esperantists in Kansas and Missouri. I knew there were at least five of us in Kansas – Two in Wichita, three in Kansas City. I made it mostly as a way for us to get to know each other and keep in touch.

For Z-Day 2014, Andy and I decided that we should have a get-together at a local restaurant & pub, The Green Room. So, we proceeded to send out messages on Lernu, and the existing circle of us five brought in any others we knew about. I’m a member of Esperanto-USA, so I went through the little directory book and sent out messages inviting anyone interested to stop in.

And now, we’re going to start having regular monthly meetings. Wow.

Tim Wand, an Esperantist that I found out of the directory book, has been in the movado for a while, and has some interesting stories to tell about the history here in the U.S.A. He has also donated quite a few old books to the club, which originally belonged to a Mr. Runser, who passed away perhaps a decade ago.

I only began learning Esperanto in 2012, so I’m not completely sure what the best thing I can do with these books is, but I’m hoping to go through them and, for anything that is in the public domain, make scans and publish online somewhere.

I took pictures of the collection tonight, and I’m posting them up; perhaps it will pique somebody’s interest, and they’ll have a suggestion for me.

*edit* I scanned the covers of all the books, and they can be viewed on the Library page.

Rejcx vs. Moosader

banner

What is going on?

Maybe you’ve passively noticed weird things going on with my username in IRC, or Twitter, or I don’t know. Maybe you haven’t. Either way, here’s an explanation for what is going on:

I’m trying to split up personal projects and posts (to go under “Rejcx”), and “professional” projects and posts (to “Moosader”).

I’ve been using “Moosader” as a personal handle online for quite a while now, but I also really like that name, and I like using it to brand my games and tutorials. I am not fond of personal forum posts and blogs being linked directly to it, or wanting to post about my life (pictures, news, etc.) and having it “spam” the Moosader accounts. That is why I’ve begun using “Rejcx” as a personal name instead.

For example: @Moosader can be about gamedev news, @Rejcx can be about my personal opinions and life, and @RejcxEO can hold my ramblings in Esperanto.

I don’t know if Moosader will ever turn into a business that has other employees, but even at the point I’m currently at, this seems to make the most sense.

And now, obligatory definitions:

  • Moosader (rhymes with “Crusader”) is a name I created while playing Ragnarok Online. As a Crusader. With antlers. Moose-Crusader, get it?
  • Rejcx is a vague, Esperantization of my name. “Rachel” would be written as “Rejĉelo”, “Rach” would be written as “Rejĉ”, and due to that annoying little hat (ok I actually love esperantajn ĉapelojn), it can be hard to type “Rejĉ” in various places. Therefore we use the “x-system” to signify hats, so “Rejĉ” becomes “Rejcx” and then it looks all l33t and crap. I think it’s cute, whatever.